Thursday, October 24, 2013


An African-American teenager  claims that a snooty Barneys staffers and New York City cops racially profiled him for credit card fraud after he bought............. a $349 belt.

Trayon Christian, 19, told the local media he filed a lawsuit after he was targeted by staffers at Barneys’ Madison Ave. flagship store and detained by police because they didn’t believe a young black man could possibly afford to buy such an expensive belt.

I can't believe that a young Black man would buy such an expensive belt. Then again, yes I can.

The fashion-forward teen, who lives with his mom in Corona, Queens, is studying engineering at the New York City College of Technology, where he had a work-study job.

Christian said his paycheck had just been direct deposited into his Chase bank account, so he went straight to Barneys on the afternoon of April 29 to buy the pricey Ferragamo belt with a silver buckle and a reversible black and white strap.

“I knew exactly what I wanted,” Christian said. He’d seen the belt on a lot of his favorite celebrities, including rapper Juelz Santana.

He said he’d browsed the ritzy rags at Barneys before but had never bought anything at the store.

“It was a quick trip. I gave them my debit card, I signed my name,” he said.

According to his lawsuit, the clerk asked Christian to show his ID, which he did.

“I showed my state ID,” he told The News.

After buying a designer belt at the flaship Barneys department store in New York, Trayon Christian was detained and then arrested by undercover cops who the teen says told him the card had to be fraudulent because he couldn't have afforded the Ferragamo accessory.After buying a designer belt at the flaship Barneys department store in New York, Trayon Christian was detained and then arrested by undercover cops who the teen says told him the card had to be fraudulent because he couldn't have afforded the Ferragamo accessory.

The clerk didn’t react as he signed for his purchase and left, he said.

But he got no more than a block from the store when two undercover NYPD detectives stopped him near E. 60th St., the lawsuit said.

“They said my card wasn’t real, it was fake. They said someone at Barneys called to report it,” said Christian.

The male detectives — whose names he never learned — asked to see ID and look in his bag, he said.

They also asked him if he worked, and where.

“I showed them my school ID and my driver’s license,” said Christian, who was 18 when the incident allegedly occurred.

“I kept thinking, ‘Why is this happening to me?’” he said.

“The detectives were asking me, ‘How could you afford a belt like this? Where did you get this money from?’” he said.

He was handcuffed and taken to the 19th Precinct stationhouse, he said.

According to his lawsuit, he was detained in a holding cell for about two hours.

He was then released with his debit card, his belt and an apology from the police, Christian said.

A spokeswoman for the NYPD denied Christian was detained for two hours, saying he was brought into the precinct at 7:04 pm and was allowed to leave at 7:45 pm

“Mr. Christian was held in police custody for approximately 42 minutes and as soon as we determined that the card was authentic, he was immediately released,” said Inspector Kim Royster.

He was never charged, according to his attorney.

“I was nervous the whole time, but not really scared because I knew I had done nothing wrong,” said the teen.

After he got home, he got angry.

“I brought the belt back to Barneys a few days later and returned it. I got my money back, I’m not shopping there again,” he said. “It’s cruel. It’s racist.”

The October 23, 2013 cover of the NY Daily News.

Calls to Barneys, which is led by CEO Mark Lee, were not returned.

The city Law Department said it hadn’t seen the court papers yet.

“We are awaiting a formal copy of the lawsuit and will review the claims upon receipt,” said Elizabeth Thomas, a Law Department spokeswoman.

The NYPD said it has gotten 53 grand larceny complaints this year for credit card fraud at Barneys’ Madison Ave. store and has made more than 47 arrests. But it’s unclear how many of those arrested were actually charged with a crime and how many were, like Christian, released.

Plainclothes officers visit Barneys periodically because of problems with fraudulent use of cards, the NYPD said.

Christian’s attorney Michael Palillo said the teen, who now works at Target, has a clean record.

“He’s never been arrested. His only crime was being a young black guy buying a $300 belt,” the lawyer said.

The student’s Facebook page shows pictures of a fashion-loving teen. In some, Christian is sporting various belts with buckles encrusted with glittering “F’s” — but it’s not clear if they are also Ferragamo items.

He’s also seen posing for selfies in a series of baseball caps that have been color-coded to match his clothes, with a gold chain and an earring peeking out.

Christian’s mother, Selena Christian, said she was outraged at the upscale store’s treatment of her son.

“Barneys said his card was stolen, they said he shouldn’t have that much money in his account,” said the 40-year-old school bus driver. “I am shocked. He’s a good kid.”

The hardworking mother could find only one reason for her son to be singled out after he’d shown ID to the Barneys staffer.

“It’s because he’s an African-American,” she said. “It’s wrong. They shouldn’t have done this.”

Being publicly questioned, searched and handcuffed and then detained in a police precinct cell caused Christian “great physical and mental distress and humiliation,” the lawsuit said.

“His reputation and character were injured and he was embarrassed,” the court papers said.

The incident was due to the “negligence, careless[ness] and recklessness of Barneys” and the undercover detectives, the lawsuit alleges.

Christian is suing the NYPD and Barneys for unspecified damages.

This incident is not a surprise at all. Racial profiling in upscale stores, and racial profiling in general is despicable. But unfortunately it has become part of the fabric of our society. It will never change.

Perhaps the thing that I love the most about writing the PRBrown Report is that I get to ask the questions that many of you are thinking. Questions like. 

Why would a young man who works in Target and lives with his mother in Corona, Queens New York, purchase a $349 belt?! Does anyone besides me find that irresponsible, crazy, and a huge waste of money. What is even crazier to me is the fact that the entire planet seems to turn a blind eye to the fact that this you man has little or no money management skills. His purchase speaks to a much larger issue. 

Much has been said in terms of the disparity in the Black community. But the fact that many of use squander or hard earned money on foolishness is rarely discussed. If each and every African-American in America was given wages equal to or even greater than their white counterparts, it won't  make a difference if it is not properly managed.


Side Bar: NO WAY!

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